Turn the Other Cheek…For Real?

There’s been a firestorm of controversy over Andy Stanley’s sermon earlier this year in which he was clear in condemning adultery as a sin, but was silent over the issue of homosexuality. This is all we’ve heard concerning Andy in the news, and I can’t say I disagree at all with the criticism, but as I’m partially through this article on CNN detailing the tense history between Andy and his father, a story he shares  kind of smacked me in the face:

When he was in the eighth grade, his father waged a bruising battle to become senior pastor of First Baptist. The battle inflamed tensions so much that his family received nasty, anonymous letters and deacons warned his father that he would never pastor again.

One night, during a tense church meeting, a man cursed aloud and slugged Charles in the jaw. Andy says his father didn’t flinch, nor did he retaliate. He kept fighting and eventually became senior pastor of First Baptist.

“I saw my dad turn the other cheek,” Andy later wrote about that night, “but he never turned tail and ran.”

His dad was his first hero.

Imagine, especially if you’re a pastor or minister of any kind, being publicly cursed and punched…in the face…in front of everyone.

What would your natural, instinctive reaction be? Perhaps you would shriek, “OWWWWWW! What did you do that for?” Maybe you would curl into the fetal position on the floor and weep uncontrollably. Or would you call your troops into action against the dissenters and engage in a Medieval battlefield clash in the middle of the church, swinging wild fists as someone in the distance wails, “FOR NARNIA!”

The most common, instinctive reaction would be to simply duck and swing back. It’s human. And in America, particularly the South, it’s what you do if you’re “a man.” I’m not even the type of guy who wakes at 4 AM to freeze to death in a deer stand, but if someone decides to (and I use this phrase with all the humor that my friend Chris finds in it) punch me in the face, I’m not 100% sure that I would do exactly what Jesus asked of us, simply take it, and turn the other cheek.

What Charles Stanley showed wasn’t weakness. After all, the story says that he “didn’t flinch.” What he did show was incredible strength of character in NOT responding. While this is purely speculative, I would imagine that the restraint that Charles Stanley showed that day was probably a factor in his eventual pastorship of First Baptist Church Atlanta.

What about you? What would your reaction be? I understand isn’t a revelatory blog post — even non-Christians know the related scripture from Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount.

It’s just a question.

Matthew 5:39 – But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also.

About these ads
Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

3 thoughts on “Turn the Other Cheek…For Real?

  1. Scott Sholar says:

    Hi Ryan. Thank you for sharing, and God bless you.

  2. I’m pretty sure this is someone picking on me a bit, but that’s okay. :) Thanks, regardless.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 31 other followers

%d bloggers like this: